CBC coverage – hardly reaches the level of the absurd.

A the end of the bloodiest day in Gaza. More than 30 people have been murdered in the past 24 hours or so, and many many more injured.

The demonstration downtown was a brief uplifting reprieve. Although I don’t particularly like chanting at demos, it did feel good to be surrounded by so many different kinds of people who all shared one thing with me, outrage.

Since I got back my soul has been weeping for my friends in Gaza. I feel so pained, and shamed, I don’t know where to turn. Social media, reading articles, posting blogs, … keeps me busy. At some point during the day it felt like I was running around my laptop and the internet like a headless chicken. I’m new to this.

All this pales naturally with what people in Gaza are living through at the moment.

Before going to bed, I go through a few news pages for the last time. In Gaza it is early morning. I’m almost shutting my laptop, but give the CBC a last check. The headline :

Death toll rises in Gaza after Israeli strikes

It is a short video clip. I click on it. It opens, a woman speaking, like this:  The most dramatic damage is in Gaza itself. But Israelis are under fire too. In the past 5 days hundreds of rockets have been launched by Palestinian militants into Israel and three people have been killed. CBC Saša Petricic is in Southern Israel where people live in close range of these rockets.

Then Petricic’ reportage picks it up. For the remainder of the time – hardly another word about Palestinians. Interview with a soldier, a citizen. We see some broom sweeping up a bit of shrapnel, looks more like small gravel to me. We hear about a missile slamming into on a hospital.  We are not told about casualties, so I presume there were none. For the remainder of the 1:51 min we do not return to the death toll in Gaza. In fact, we are never informed about how high it rose today.

That’s it!  We only hear about Israelis.

I check out two more clips. Reporting almost 100% from the Israeli perspective. We do not get to hear one person living in Gaza speak. The third clip is a long five minute interview with a Canadian teacher, Terri Millstone, in Ashdod in Israel, who takes us through the stress of living through a day continuously having to duck from rockets. The reporter is awed.

The scenes I watched earlier, from Aljazeera and independent news channels, of panic and hysteria in Gaza, of a father carrying the dead corpse of his infant son, of another father waiting to pick up the corpse of his 10-year old daughter from the morgue. These scenes, again, apparently not worthy of showing us.

A white Canadian woman who just wants to live a normal life in a democracy deserves all our compassion.

The bleeding wounded, the corpses, the children ripped apart by bombs of Palestinians, of Arabs, of Muslims, well, they apparently don’t deserve our compassion. They are just business as usual. We’re supposed to be used to them living in misery, crying, shrieking, dying. Why bother showing them?

The quality of such reporting doesn’t even reach the level of the absurd.

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